Why Hemp?

Hemp’s nickname is “the wonder crop” - and for good reason. When talking sustainability, hemp is the envy of other crops. Hemp can create thousands of different byproducts - many of which are greener (and technically superior) alternatives to their conventional counterparts. Hemp has the power to help save and nurture our environment and we’re excited to be a part of the movement. 

 

Sustainability is more important than ever

We can no longer ignore the needs of our planet - we have to listen to it. Global warming is real, and if we don’t start making changes now, future generations will face serious repercussions of our actions. There are many ways to incorporate sustainable practices into your everyday life, such as buying organic when possible and limiting the use of plastic in your house. You can never start too small; what’s important is that you start. Botana is our start and a journey that we invite you on.

Hemp is:

 

The soil's best friend

 

We briefly mentioned that hemp is a wonder crop, and now we’ll get into the weeds (no pun intended). Let’s start with the root! When hemp is cultivated its roots detoxify, enrich and restore the soil through bio-accumulation and phytoremediation. In other words, hemp’s roots draw out heavy metals and toxins, absorb carbon dioxide, and return significant amounts of nutrients. This prevents soil pollution and keeps our land healthier for longer periods of time. In fact, hemp was even planted at Chernobyl with hopes to remedy the polluted soil and water.


[On the other hand, cotton and many other crops extract water and nutrients without replenishment, which harms, pollutes and deteriorates the soil.]

 

A farmer's dream

 

Compared to cotton, hemp needs just one third of the amount of water to grow. In turn, one acre of hemp produces three times the amount of fiber as one acre of cotton. Hemp is also naturally resistant to pests and mold, so it doesn’t require the use of pesticides or herbicides. Hemp is also able to grow in different soils, climates and in small spaces, opening up the potential for farmers all over the world to cultivate hemp.

 

Just scratching the surface

 

When processed, hemp creates bio-products that provide greener alternatives to traditionally unsustainable products. One of the biggest game changers is hemp bioplastic - a 100% biodegradable plastic alternative that degrades within 10 days of discarding it. Hemp can also be made into paper and wood, which presents a sustainable alternative to the troublesome timber industry that can prevent deforestation. There’s also “hempoline”, or hemp bio-fuel, that can replace petroleum gasoline, as well as “hempcrete”, a replacement for conventional concrete. We’re sure by now you’ve heard of (and likely tried) a CBD product. Can you guess where CBD comes from? Yep, it’s hemp! Lastly hemp can be made into a variety of textiles, which presents a sustainable alternative to fast fashion and can help alleviate many negative impacts of the textile industry.
 

Botana Hemp Bedding 

 

When first introduced to hemp, we were in awe of the versatility of the plant and knew we wanted to create something with it. After learning about hemp fabric properties, bedding was a natural fit. Apart from the sustainability benefits, hemp fabric is antibacterial, antimicrobial, hypoallergenic and thermoregulating - it’s clean, strong, and stays cool in the summer. Over time, repeated washings make it even softer, like your favorite old t-shirt. This fits with a central tenet of sustainability: buy things that last.


Though hemp is an ancient crop - thought to be the first crop cultivated by humans for fiber, a piece of hemp cloth was discovered in present-day Iran that dates back to 8,000 B.C. - it was illegal to farm in the United States until December 2018. After the Farm bill passed, making hemp legal once again, an age-old industry was reborn. We may be starting with bedding but we hope to make home goods of all kinds, all made from hemp. Our motto is to “Dream Responsibly,” but it’s not just a clever tagline, it’s a call to action: together, we can build a more sustainable planet.

 

 

 

Sources

Burns, Janet. “We Should Be Pouring Time And Money Into Hemp, Period.” Forbes, Forbes Magazine, 9 Dec. 2018, www.forbes.com/sites/janetwburns/2018/09/30/we-should-be-pouring-time-and-money-into-hemp-period/.

Fox, Chloe. “The Sustainable Wonder Crop That's Sweeping The Nation.” HuffPost, HuffPost, 7 Dec. 2017, www.huffpost.com/entry/hemp-sustainable-crop_n_5243351.

Johansen, Adrian. “The Environmental Impact of Hemp – Is Hemp Sustainable?” Get Green Now, 24 Jan. 2020, get-green-now.com/environmental-impact-of-hemp/.

Its Hemp Co. “Environmental Impact of Hemp.” Medium, Medium, 14 Oct. 2019, medium.com/@itshempco/environmental-impact-of-hemp-6940d84fbd34.

. “The People's History.” The Thistle, 2000, www.mit.edu/~thistle/v13/2/history.html.

Wikipedia. “Hemp Farming Act of 2018.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 1 Nov. 2019, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp_Farming_Act_of_2018.

Hemp is better for the planet and better for your sleep

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